press - Nellie Mae Rowe


2018 -In Paris, Black Doll Exhibition Explores Women’s Craft, History of Childhood Play, and Dynamics of America’s Racial Structure

 A 2018 exhibition at La Maison Rouge in Paris presented art objects produced during an early period in American history. “Black Dolls: The Deborah Neff Collection”  features more than 200 dolls hand made between the 1840s and 1940s. 

 

Nellie Mae Rowe, whose dolls were created a bit later than most, is one of only three artists who are cited by name in this exhibition; the makers of most of the dolls are unknown.

 

Learn more here.

 

Read Slate.com review by Jordan G. Teicher

 

Read the Culture Type review by Victoria L. Valentine

 

Read the ArtDaily review

 

Nellie Mae Rowe, “Untitled (Red Doll/Poupée Rouge),” Vinings, Georgia, 1970–1980


2017 - Museums Celebrate the Black Women Artists History Has Overlooked

 

By Priscilla Frank, Arts and Culture Reporter

The Huffington Post, February 20, 2017 (Updated February 24, 2017)

 

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Nellie Mae Rowe, “Untitled (Two Figures and Animal,” Vinings, Georgia, 1979–1980


2014 - The New YOrker Magazine Review: The met embraces neglected southern artists

 

Nellie Mae Rowe's work is well-represented in the gift made to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, by The Souls Grown Deep Foundation.  The venerable museum was given its pick of the 1,500 or so works of art in the collection.  Of the 19 works by Nellie Mae Rowe that the Foundation owned, 5 were chosen by the Met.

 

The Met Embraces Neglected Southern Artists

By Paige Williams, for The New Yorker Magazine

December 4, 2014

 

Nellie Mae Rowe, Rocking Chair, 1981


1999 - An artist who didn't know she was one

 

 

 

 

A review of the Museum of American Folk Art's exhibition, Nellie Mae Rowe: Ninety-Nine-and-a-Half Won’t Do

 

By Tessa DiCarlo, for The New York Times

January 3, 1999

 

 

Nellie Mae Rowe, Cow Jump Over the Mone,1978


1978 - The Atlanta Journal

 

 

"Nellie Mae Rowe Draws Random Line, Gives Form to Memories That Crowd In" by W.C. Burnett for The Atlanta Journal

 

Read text here